Periodontal disease or periodontitis?
We often hear from patients that they have periodontal disease. And upon examination, it turns out that this is gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) or periodontitis (which is much more…

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Psychology in endodontics. Microscope in endodontic practice, personal observations
Since 1999, I have been working with an endodontic microscope, during this time my attitude to this subject has evolved from irritation due to the need to retrain, to drug…

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Author's view on the problem of broken tools
This article presents the author's view of Dr. M. Solomonov on the problem of broken instruments from a biological point of view. The author created a clinical decision making scheme…

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implant

Ankylosis. Part V: Autotransplantation

Usually, in the treatment of ankylosed teeth in children, it is recommended to remove such teeth before intensive growth cycles so that the growth and subsequent teething do not create significant defects in hard and soft tissues. However, the difficulty in treating these patients is to temporarily replace missing teeth until growth ceases. This is especially true for male patients, when the injury occurs at an early age (i.e., aged 9 to 11 years) and when growth may not be completed by 21-22 years. Continue reading

Ankylosis. Part IV: Using Deconorization

As a rule, when choosing a method for treating permanent ankylosed teeth in children, it is recommended that they be removed before the final growth of the jaws. Then, subsequent teething during growth will not create a significant defect in hard and soft tissues. However, attempting to remove ankylosed teeth can be a difficult task.
In this example, a 11-year-old boy was injured in his upper jaw when he was 10 years old. Subsequently, tooth ankylosis 1.1 was formed. Continue reading

Ankylosis. Part II: Treatment of adults with tooth ankylosis

It is known that the root of an ankylosed tooth usually undergoes resorption and subsequent replacement with bone tissue. In addition, if ankylosis occurs before the growth and development of the jaw is complete, a defect in hard / soft tissue will be present in the area of ​​the affected tooth.

However, if tooth ankylosis has formed after growth is complete, this may not affect the position of hard and soft tissues. Continue reading

Cone-beam Computed Tomography as a Noninvasive Assistance Tool for Oral Cutaneous Sinus Tract Diagnosis: A Case Series
Abstract An oral cutaneous sinus tract is a relatively uncommon condition that is generally associated with long-standing periapical inflammation. The traditional process of oral cutaneous sinus tract diagnosis is an…

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What you need to know about dental implants
How is implant placement performed? The implant placement on average takes 15-20 minutes. After the doctor, together with the patient, planned the type of implantation and selected the implant system,…

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Seven major violations in the design of a smile
Students and practitioners are increasingly turning to digital smile design techniques to directly demonstrate potential aesthetic changes to patients and members of the treatment team (including dental technicians). The principles…

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Talk about "sore" or what affects the cost of dental treatment
It is difficult to find a person who would not go to the dentist with "acute" pain. A person who is not familiar with this unbearable pain that interferes with…

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