Temporary restorations: the key to success
For dentists who have recently completed training, temporary restorations are often not considered an important part of treatment, but rather are a simple temporary solution between obtaining an impression and…

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Is it possible to restore a tooth if a piece breaks away from it?
A common situation - an unsuccessfully caught nut or other hard object in food leads to tooth damage right up to a chip. The same thing happens with the bones…

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Periodontal disease or periodontitis?
We often hear from patients that they have periodontal disease. And upon examination, it turns out that this is gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) or periodontitis (which is much more…

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implant

Ankylosis. Part V: Autotransplantation

Usually, in the treatment of ankylosed teeth in children, it is recommended to remove such teeth before intensive growth cycles so that the growth and subsequent teething do not create significant defects in hard and soft tissues. However, the difficulty in treating these patients is to temporarily replace missing teeth until growth ceases. This is especially true for male patients, when the injury occurs at an early age (i.e., aged 9 to 11 years) and when growth may not be completed by 21-22 years. Continue reading

Ankylosis. Part IV: Using Deconorization

As a rule, when choosing a method for treating permanent ankylosed teeth in children, it is recommended that they be removed before the final growth of the jaws. Then, subsequent teething during growth will not create a significant defect in hard and soft tissues. However, attempting to remove ankylosed teeth can be a difficult task.
In this example, a 11-year-old boy was injured in his upper jaw when he was 10 years old. Subsequently, tooth ankylosis 1.1 was formed. Continue reading

Ankylosis. Part II: Treatment of adults with tooth ankylosis

It is known that the root of an ankylosed tooth usually undergoes resorption and subsequent replacement with bone tissue. In addition, if ankylosis occurs before the growth and development of the jaw is complete, a defect in hard / soft tissue will be present in the area of ​​the affected tooth.

However, if tooth ankylosis has formed after growth is complete, this may not affect the position of hard and soft tissues. Continue reading

Do you "wedge" your teeth before a composite restoration in the lateral region?
Composite materials for direct restoration of the lateral tooth group are the most common in clinical practice. However, clinicians often need to make a lot of efforts in order to…

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Brushing teeth
Let's first understand what plaque is. What happens, what consequences it leads to and how to deal with it. Plaque is an accumulation of bacteria in the form of a…

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Crowding of teeth
Among the various dental problems encountered in young and adult patients, one rather serious one should be noted - crowded teeth. This phenomenon is an anomaly of development characterized by…

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Ankylosis. Part II: Treatment of adults with tooth ankylosis
It is known that the root of an ankylosed tooth usually undergoes resorption and subsequent replacement with bone tissue. In addition, if ankylosis occurs before the growth and development of…

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